Forgetfulness, Fishing Firsts and Monsters From The Deep

Forgetfulness

Weather was tipped to be good so I snuck out of work to get things ready for a reef trip from Lucinda.

I packed the boat up whilst the husband packed the car (good teamwork) and we headed off up to my weekend happy place. By weekend happy place I mean our fishing caravan at Lucinda Wanderers Holiday Village. A place of rest, relaxation and best of all a fishing launch pad!

About an hour twenty up the highway, Mike turns to me and asks if i had put the food in the car. “Food?” I asked, “I thought you were doing that”. Well we had a chuckle (honestly!), as we had left all the chilled food back at home in the fridge! So after a quick pit stop into Woolies at Ingham we eventually made it to my happy place.

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Just checking the boat is still there!

We headed out early Saturday morning, weather was pretty great, only a small breeze and small swell. Half way across the paddock heading out to the reef I had a niggling sensation in my little happy brain. I turned to Mike and asked if he had put the bungs in. He replied “no that is usually your job to check”. It was too (my job!). Ooops, so we pulled up and I leaned over to pop them in. Oh that was better at least we wouldn’t sink and my brain went back to feeling happy without any odd niggling sensations.

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Beautiful morning

Talking of bungs, I am usually quite religious about checking them before I get up on the boat to launch it. This comes from learning the hard way up in the NT where there is a crocodile for every 2 meters of waterway.

In a billabong called Corroboree up in the NT I learnt my lesson about how important it is to check the bungs before launching the boat. Corroboree is well-known for having loads of huge crocodiles and we had put the boat in for a day of chasing Barramundi. Not long after launching we heard a funny noise and noticed water was coming out of the side of the boat. We realised it was the bilge pump and then it dawned on us, we didn’t put the bungs in! So being the true gentleman that my husband is, he volunteered to croc watch while I leaned over the side of the boat and popped the bungs in. Luckily I was pretty quick and got them in without getting my arm chewed off by a crocodile that my gentleman of a husband didn’t see because it was lurking under the water. Hence lesson learned!

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Just one of the many crocs in Corroboree

Now my husband and I have a robust discussion about when the bungs should go in. He tells me all the time we should put the bungs in before we leave home. I am more of the opinion that we should put them in at the boat ramp. This opinion has been formed from my time in Darwin when I was driving home from the boat ramp one day and we had the most almighty downpour. Now in Darwin when it rains, it buckets it down. The bungs were still in the boat and I had to pull over (I could not see where I was driving the rain was that hard). All I could see in my mirrors was the boat filling with water and sloshing over the sides. I had to jump out and take the bungs out so the boat could drain before I could set off again. Needless to say I got very wet! But I must concede that in the this instance he might be right (don’t tell him I said so ladies!), the bungs probably should be in before we go anywhere, less chance of forgetting!

Fishing Firsts

Back to the story at hand ……… we headed out to the Great Barrier Reef, targeting some spots around Bramble Reef. The first spot we pulled up at we dropped down some squid bait and bang! Onto a fish straight away, (well done skipper for getting us on the spot). After pulling up a few undersized Coral Trouts and miscellaneous reef fish I caught my first Red Emporer. Ok it was only a juvenile but it was a beauty.

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Juvenile Red Emporer (my first ever)

A few more reef fish and then a beauty of a Pink-Eared Emporer (another first for me). This one went 39cm and I was very proud of it, but released it healthy to fight another day.

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Pink-Eared Emporer (another first for me)

We did notice a lot of big sharks around and Mike brought in a head of a rather large reef fish, yes just the head, the rest was dinner for one of the many sharks around. We moved around a bit to see if we could find any larger fish but they all seemed to be on holiday!

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We are very lucky up here, with the beautiful ocean, colourful reef and abundance of fish and marine life. We saw several turtles, large schools of tuna and leaping fish throughout the day. For me, the enjoyment comes from being out on the water, with my favourite skipper (husband), catching lot’s of beautiful fish and releasing them to fight another day. I like catching big fish, but the little ones give me the same enjoyment, especially when they are as beautiful as the Coral Trouts or Emporers. It not all about the size ladies!!!

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Turtle having a swim

We did notice a few Remora (you know, the sucker fish) swimming around and hiding under the boat, but we never thought anything of it until I hooked up and had a bit of a fight on my hands. I thought it was a shark at first until I got it up enough to see, it was a Remora. As I was bringing it in it decided to attach itself to the underside of the boat. Boy oh boy do these stick, like really stick. After several attempts to pull it off, prise it off and coax it off the underside of our boat, I resigned myself to the fact that it was not going anywhere, it was definitely stuck!

So Mike decided that we should drive off and see if he pops off himself. So off we went, slowly at first but still he was not budging. After a couple of minutes up on the plane he decided he would let go and I had to reel him in again, this time making sure he didn’t get close to the boat again!

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We decided we would start heading back in and have a fish at a few spots on the way. We saw plenty of tuna and bait busting up but could not get near them to throw a slice, they move so fast! We stopped at a spot a friend of ours put us on and had a look around. There really was nothing to note coming up on the sounder but we thought we would drop a line in any way and see if something was swimming by.

Monsters From The Deep

Mike hooked up a beautiful Cobia and had a fun time trying to get the guy in the boat. I then hooked up on something large that started taking line, I tried and tried to get it in the boat but it snapped off and I lost it.

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Mike’s Cobia

Feeling a bit knackered and deflated I dropped my line down again and then hooked up on a Gold Spot Trevally, this was not huge but did put up a great fight.

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Gold Spot Trevally

Last cast of the day saw me hook up something huge. It started taking line like nobody’s business and I could only gain back a quarter of what it was taking. As I saw my line being stripped off the reel Mike put the boat in reverse to make it easier for me to wind in. This thing was heavy and a dead weight. It was not really giving me head shakes it would just take off then sink to the bottom. Trying to gain line back was nearly impossible and it felt like I was trying to lift the sea floor! Twenty minutes of reeling and fighting and I was getting real tired. Mike was helping by backing the boat up and I was gaining line back from this monster. Problem was I was tiring quicker than the fish!!!! Then the inevitable happened. DINK, the line snapped at the hook and the monster (what ever it was) swam off to live and fight another day.

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After that we decided to call it a day, and what a wonderful day it was. I was going back to our fishing caravan, sore and weary but a happy girl, having a wonderful day out on the water with my husband!

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On the Hunt for Sooty Grunter

Bivouac Junction Holiday Camp is just outside of Charters Towers in North Queensland. The Drabbles and ourselves decided we needed to go for a weekend of camping and fishing so we packed up the tent, camper trailer and fishing rods and off we went.

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It was very dry and dusty when we arrived, but we were assured there was water in the river and creek systems around the area, so we were happy enough.  Once our camp was set up, we got the fire going and started our own dinner prep. After dinner, with a few beers round the camp fire we planned the following day’s exploration and fishing.

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We were after some sooty grunter in the surrounding creeks and rivers and Drabs was the authority on where, how and with what to catch them. So, we woke early in the morning, and after a bit of brekky we found out that Di did not sleep very well last night. It seemed that the peacocks and snoring generally kept her awake. Well we could not do anything about the peacocks but we move dour tent away from their camper trailer to try and eliminate the snoring noises (just anote to say it was not me snoring by the way).

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Once we had cleaned up our camp and loaded our respective vehicles with fishing paraphenalia and lunch, we set off to find some not so dry creek beds down which we could drive in search of the elusive sooty.

Now there is always a lot of banter between Drabs and Mike, Patrol vs Prado, whose 4wd is better, who knows more about off road driving, who is the true blue “Aussiest”! This makes for some light entertainment for Di and I listening to them and their growing list of over exaggerated claims. Mike and I were relatively new to the whole 4×4 driving thing and I always deferred to Drabs on the fishing front (after all he has been doing it most of his life and I have only been fishing for about 10 years).

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Following the Drabbles we pulled off the highway onto a dry creek bed and promptly came to a halt. Drabs had got his Patrol stuck in the soft sand and we hadn’t even gone 200 yards! Well we laughed and laughed, cracking some jokes about Patrol’s vs Prado’s (like you do), as he pulled his Maxtraxs out and let his tyres down. We also reduced our tyre pressure and set off down the creek bed in search of the elusive sooty.

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We fished a few of the deeper areas of the creek and Drabs caught a couple of good sooty (I got nothing, but it was not for lack of trying). The area had narrow bands of water running over rocks with low hanging trees and good shaded areas where the sooty hang out. Perfect fishing country. After a big wet out here the creeks and rivers are in full flood, water rushing over the rocks, uprooting trees and flooding up to the banks. Unfortunatley the area had been in drought for quite a while and the creek beds were mainly sand with the creek running shallow and narrow in many places.

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Now Drabs is a diehard fisherman and he decided the other bank was the place to be so off he went, walking and swimming across the creek with rod held high out of the water. This was bit too hardcore for me, even though we were in fresh water I was still concerned about crocodiles and other nasties lurking unseen. He got to the other side with only a few little mishaps such as falling down a couple of big holes and almost losing his hat in the water, but his rod was kept dry and above his head at all times (told you he was diehard).

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As we sat on the bank relaxing and keeping an eye on him over the other side (to make sure he did not disappear down a hole or become croc bait) we heard a big whoop and he was on. He got a couple of nice sooty for his troubles. I looked on, enviously, but still not game enough to venture over. I was a bit chicken I suppose but even though I love fishing there are just some lengths I would not go to get the elusive sooty.

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After a spot of lunch, we ventured further down the creek bed and reached an area where we needed to cross the creek. Like a true blue Aussie Drabs took one for the team and went first. It took him a few attempts to get across, going backward and forward, trying not to get bogged in the middle. It was not deep but the sand was very soft (apparently, although the Prado made it in one go!). Maybe the Patrol did not like getting its feet wet!

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So off we set again and to find another likely fishing spot. As we were driving I looked out of my window to see the Patrol struggling to get up a very, very, very, small bump of sand. I pointed this out to Mike and we had a bit of a giggle. Reaching for the radio I asked if the Patrol would like a little push from our Prado to assist with the massive obstacle it was facing. For some reason Drabs did not find that too funny, although I am sure I could hear Di laughing in the background! After a few attempts the Patrol managed to climb Everest and we got back on the route down to the creek.

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Drabs caught several sooty grunters that day and I even bagged myself a little on. Unfortunately, I cannot find the picture of it, but I did catch one (honestly!). But truth be told it was a lovely couple of days spent in good company and exploring different scenery and having a few laughs along the way.

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Check out Bivouac Junction Holiday Camp and the surrounding creeks for your own sooty adventure.

https://www.facebook.com/bivouacjunction/

Share a Fishing Passion – Join a Local Fishing Club

Townsville Clubs

When we moved to Townsville my husband realised that I needed to join a fishing club to get together with like-minded locals and find out more about fishing. Now as you may or may not be aware, I am passionate about fishing, would fish 24/7 if I could, love it, love it, love it! The only problem was I used to flounder around, not really knowing what I was doing, dropping a badly tied fishing line in the water and relying more on luck than judgement if I caught a fish!

So, in order to gain some knowledge, we joined a fishing club in Townsville. I thought this club was pretty great to start with, full of very knowledgeable people, some of who even went fishing and seemed to know what they were talking about. It wasn’t until I had been in the club for about a year that I realised the club had issues. Now these issues were the same issues that many clubs all around the world face, money and people issues! The club was very financially solvent, and this led to bickering and arguing over how to spend the money. The meetings became more about the money less about fishing! So, when friends of ours (who had left and moved to another fishing club) told us about Alice River Anglers, we went along and promptly joined up.

Alice River Anglers

Now this was a club we could really enjoy. It was all about the fishing! The first meeting we went along to we realised that this was a group of people who really enjoyed fishing and used the club as a way to socialise with people who really enjoyed fishing.  The “business” part of the meeting was short and sweet, there were meat tray raffles and members draws every meeting, kid’s categories for weigh ins and prize draws and generally a much more sociable atmosphere. Yes, this was a club we could be happy in.

It wasn’t until we had joined this club that we actually started to catch fish by judgement rather than luck (luck still plays a huge part, but we are getting better thanks to advice and assistance from the members of Alice River). The first year there I think I only weighed in a couple of fish for the whole year, but the people in the club were all very free with their advice and assistance to enable me to improve.

From this…….

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to this…….

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to this ………

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The club has a very welcoming vibe, everyone is friendly and accepting of new members. There have been some membership and people issues over the years (what club does not get them), but the President and committee have done a great job of trying to filter and resolve those issues without affecting the main club and the members. The club is run for its members, not for any financial gain or status within the community. The focus of the committee is to keep the club running smoothly and to provide a great vibe and social space for like-minded fisher people to come together and enjoy themselves. I must say they hit the target pretty well. The focus is not on growing membership (although all new members are very welcome and are made to feel part of the group instantly), nor is it on how much money they can make. It is about raising enough funds through sponsorship, membership fees and club raffles to hold two social functions a year and to provide the members with prizes for the weigh-ins.

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Club meetings

We have been at the club for about 4 years now and the year before last they introduced a female angler fishing prize. Yay! I could actually win something (as I struggle to compete with the big boys and their big fish). The club genuinely wants to encourage everyone to get out there and fish and enjoy it.

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Winner winner

At the end of September, we will be going up to Lucinda for our annual club trip away on the long weekend. This is a fun weekend where club members all fish the same area and then get together in the evenings for socialising, with plenty of eating and drinking. Photos will go on my Instagram after (only if I caught fish though!)

So, if you want to mix with people with the same interests as you in a friendly environment where you may make good friends and learn new things join your local fishing club. We did and have not looked back since!

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From the Banks of the Jardine

The Jardine river in the far north of Queensland is a huge body of water that starts in the mountains of the Great Dividing Range and meets the sea near Mutee Heads.

It is the largest perennial river in Queensland. For those of you who are a bit shy to look that up, it means it has continuous flow in parts of its river bed all year round. The catchment takes up the whole of the Jardine River National Park, about 3,282 square kilometres of mostly uninhabited country. So, needless to say, this river is huge!

It is also beautiful, remote, pristine and peaceful and has become my favourite place in Cape York.

Banks of the Jardine

We had travelled to the Cape with two other couples and spent some time up at Loyalty Beach near Bamaga. We then decided, on our way down, we would camp at the mouth of the Jardine to spend a few days off the grid, fishing and relaxing. Off we set, in convoy, heading towards Mutee Heads and then down the dirt tracks to some camping areas on the banks of the Jardine. Now one set of friends were towing a camper trailer (you may be familiar with them from my other blogs, yes it was the Drabbles). That camper trailer had issues! One set of bearings was almost shot, and the brakes were welded on. So, we took the Prado off down the tracks to ensure that the slopes and conditions were ok for the Drabbles to follow.

As we came around a corner we encountered some very deep and soft sand and oops, just like that, were stuck. So out we get, removing the max tracks and started digging. We radioed back up to the convoy to let them know not to take the right fork and set about extracting ourselves from the very, very, very soft sand. Now it was little eerie in that we had no response on the radio, we were surrounded by bush in the middle of nowhere and we were struggling to get ourselves out of the sand. In the distance we could hear a strange noise, a mixture of whining and grinding, getting louder and louder. My imagination was running away with me and I decided that we were going to be captured and sacrificed to some remote god in a spectacular fashion. The noise grew louder and as I looked over onto the other track (the one we should have taken) I saw the culprit! Here came the BT-50 freewheeling down the slope whining and grinding its way through the right-hand track sans camper trailer, (without getting stuck), to then end up in front of us, closely followed by the Greens in their Patrol and camper trailer. When they had had finished taking the good old Michael out of us and managed to stop laughing long enough, they hooked up the snatch strap our little Prado and dragged us out of the sand. Off we went again.

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(no pictures as the camera lady was a bit stressed, hot and bothered!)

We got to the banks of the Jardine and sussed out the camping areas. Mike and I decided that we would go scouting up to the mouth to see whether there were better campsites up there. Yet another mistake, second time in the same day we got stuck in very soft sand. Again, we had to get the Patrol to come and snatch us out. How very embarrassing! So, considering our failure, we decided to camp at our first stop, we just could not take any more humiliation.

(still no pictures of this as I was getting a bit cranky! Can’t think why)

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We made it back to the camp area only to find out that Di had photographed a map telling us there were bad sand bogs where we had just been. Thanks for the heads-up Di!!!!!! (With friends like that……. Need I say more!)

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The area was beautiful, we were camped in the next area along from the other two couples. Not that we are anti-social at all but there were some snoring issues coming from the Green’s camper trailer and I do not play nicely if I don’t get enough sleep! So, we set up our tent and then helped the others set up a communal area to cook and eat in front of a beautiful campfire overlooking the Jardine.

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We shared cooking duties for the next few days and I must admit the cooking, company, wine and views were amazing.

So, we got back to camp with tall tales of the huge ones that got away, over a few beers and a fantastic beef stew and dumplings. Wow another beautiful day in the far north of Queensland.

We stayed at this camp for 5 days in total, mainly because we were waiting for the bearings to be delivered to Bamaga for the Drabbles camper trailer, but also because it was amazing. The scenery was beautiful, the weather was great, the fishing was fantastic, and the company was awesome. But, as with all good things it had to come to an end and we had to head back to civilisation! (picture sad face emoji).

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So, on the morning of the 5th day we woke up and started packing up ready for the trip back to Bamaga. That is when I heard Di yelling, “Oi come and look at this!” we dutifully headed onto the beach in front of their camp and promptly freaked out to see the croc tracks leading up from the Jardine to just below their camp. The crocodile had obviously found something nice to eat just under the sand and then promptly wandered off back to the water again. In the immortal words of Steve Irwin “Crikey he was a big un!”

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Maybe it was a good idea to boot scoot out of there! So long Jardine and thanks for all the Barra!

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Women Can Fish Too

Fishing should be a recreational past time that is accessible to all: men, women and children. So how do we fare in the fishing equality stakes in Australia?

Well let’s start with the media. Australia has an abundance of fishing shows, IFish, Hook Line and Sinker, Fishing Australia, Escape with ET, Creek to Coast, Fishing Australia, Fishing Addiction (and the list goes on!). These shows all have one thing in common, they are hosted by men and filmed from a male perspective using male gender noun and pronouns. Rarely do you see women on these shows and if you do catch a glimpse they are usually either bikini clad models or introduced as somebody’s wife.

So, what is my point? Well guys believe it or not women can fish (in their own right, on their own, without male assistance) too! Now do not get me wrong, I am not a raving feminist that thinks all men are oppressors of the female species. Quite the opposite actually. I have a very supportive husband who is very patient with my fishing obsession event though he does not share my degree of passion for the sport (he is long-suffering). I also realise that physically there are some things I cannot do as well as men (such as use brute strength to undo a jar of jam). But I can fish! I love fishing, I would be out on the water 24/7 if my bank balance (and marriage) allowed.

So, what can we do to address the gender inequality in the fishing world?

Let me share with you my experience of being a woman who lives and breathes fishing in a male dominated region of Australia.

Boats

I found my love of fishing in Darwin. We moved to Darwin in 2007 and no sooner had we settled in we decided that we should buy a boat. Well why not? The only safe way to enjoy the water in Darwin is in the confines of a boat (due to the big lizards with teeth they had up there). In truth I did not know that many people in Darwin and certainly knew less about fishing.

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Our new boat

Once on the water I quickly realised that fishing was my thing. I would convince my husband to take me out as much as possible onto the pristine waters of Darwin Harbour where we fumbled around trying to work out the best places and ways to catch fish. I must say not many fish were caught in the four years we were in Darwin, but it did confirm my feeling, that fishing was my passion.

I would do anything to go fishing (well almost anything!). I was lucky enough to have a couple of work colleagues who also went fishing with their partners so I could share fishing stories and ask for tips and pointers on how to improve. After a few years the girls at work decided that a day out fishing (girls only) was just what we needed. After organising who, where and what we were going to do we left the fellas at home and headed out bright and early one Saturday morning to a beautiful billabong for a day’s fish.

Bang that was where I caught my very first Barra, thanks to an all girl crew, and become even more obsessed with fishing!

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My very first Barramundi

This was when I realised girls can do this stuff! It was also when I realised that the boat needed to transform and I needed to lift my game in the fishing stakes.

Fishing Clubs

We moved to Townsville in 2011 and I got very worried. I had left my fishing chicks in Darwin and moved to somewhere that was so much busier, too many boats on the water. How was I ever going to find the right places to fish, where could I go, who could I go with. My trusted husband was there of course and he put a lot of time and effort in to get me out on the water and find me places to fish. In fact, he was the one that suggested we join a fishing club, so that is exactly what we did.

We joined the Townsville Fishing Club and I became very aware that there were only a couple of women in the club who actively fished (and enjoyed it!). I became firm friends with one of the women and also made friends with a few of the fellas. When a few of the members moved clubs, we joined them and became members of the Alice River Fishing Club. This, again, was a male dominated club but I was made to feel welcome and slowly the club evolved into a more female friendly environment.

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It’s still a fish!

Clubs are a great way to meet like-minded individuals that share your passion. It can be daunting to join a club that is male dominated, but there is just something about fishing that makes most men forget your gender and talk to you like a normal human being. My advice would be to go and get involved, go to club meetings, speak to people (including the dreaded men) and get as much information from them as possible. Many times, I have been in a situation where my love and passion for fishing has seen me meet new people and break down the stereotypical views that some men hold on women and fishing.

Women Can

I was a little fortunate in the fact that I learnt a lot of my boat driving skills in Darwin where it was sparsely populated and so I did not feel the pressure as you would on some of Queensland’s busier waterways. I learnt very quickly how to drive the boat on the trailer, due to a healthy respect for the big toothed lizards in the water up in Darwin. This would stun a few blokes at the boat ramp (especially the ones that were holding and manually winching their boats on to the trailers). I have lost count of the times some bloke stopped and stared as I drove the boat up onto the trailer, some congratulating me on my skills, some just too dumfounded to speak (omg it was chick that did that!). For me, to be able to do these things is a matter of female pride and I have to admit I get a great sense of achievement when I do it right. I do not always get it right though, I still miss the mark sometimes and pray that no one is watching, but I do breathe a sigh of relief when it all goes well when I have an audience. Although, I must admit that I am absolutely hopeless at backing the trailer down the boat ramp! I definatley need a lot more practise at that before I am allowed to do it in public, (typical female I hear you cry!)

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Ladies Game Fishing Competition

I also had to learn to look after my own tackle and tie fishing knots. As previously mentioned my husband is not really that keen on fishing, so he would drive the boat and I would rig his rods and lures as payment for his services. I spent a lot of time practising knot tying and I must say some have failed me through the years. I also spent a fair bit of time in my local tackle shop (Fishing Warehouse in Townsville). Now I have to say these guys at the shop are amazing. They give me so much assistance and impart their knowledge to me on what bait/lure to use, where to use it, how to use it etc. They are an amazing friendly bunch even if they are all blokes!

It pays to get in with your local tackle store. They have a lot of local knowledge and will even assist you in how to rig your bait, lures and line etc. Make the most of the “woman” thing and pump them for their expertise!

Find a Friend

Fishing is always better when you can enjoy it in good company. I have been fortunate enough to have a few good female friends who love to fish. I met my current fishing buddy through friends in Townsville. Mad Mel they call her (and for a very good reason I might add). She is your typical independent, passionate fisher. She is very outgoing and is not afraid to get out there and give everything a crack (so much so she scares me at times!) She owns her own boat called Miss Adventures, because she is very accident prone and goes fishing on her own a fair bit.

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Mad Mel in Miss Adventures

Now we are polar opposites. I am an original pom, not too fit, bit of an academic, work in project development, base career is an accountant, outdoorsy in a comfortable way. She on the other hand is an original true-blue Aussie, gives everything and anything a go, pretty fit, very independent, scrubs dunnies for a living (her words not mine) and calls me a bit of a princess (just because I have my finger nails painted on the boat!) We only really have fishing in common, but the friendship works! We work well together on the boat (that is mainly because she bosses me around and I let her!) and we get out there and have a crack.

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Fishing Buddies

We started entering fishing competitions together and I must say we have an absolute ball. Many of the fishing comps in our area are male dominated so we take great pleasure at turning up on sign in night to see a room full of men go silent as we walk in. You can almost hear a pin drop and you can see what is going through their heads … “hey love, looks like you are in the wrong place!” or “well this should be fun, what would chicks know about Barra fishing!”

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Cardwell Barra Bash

But being the fearless ladies that we are we get in, get on and mingle with the guys. I must admit that once they are aware of how much we love fishing we become part of the clique in no time. Luckily neither of us are shy so we just start talking to the other competition entrants and eventually get accepted. I do have an ulterior motive in that these guys usually know a lot about fishing so playing the unknowledgeable female can usually score me some good tips and pointers.

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Winner Winner Chicken Dinner

And the Point Is?

The morale of the story? Ladies put yourselves out there! There is nothing in our DNA as females that stops us from learning how to drive a boat, back a car, rig rods, tie knots or find fish. If you love fishing and want to enjoy the great outdoors, as Nike said, JUST DO IT!

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And if you need any help or a bit of encouragement, I am willing to impart my vast array of knowledge (just joking I don’t know that much, I will refer you to Mad Mel).

Check out Mad Mel Fishing facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Madmelfishing/

Lucinda Heaven

Who would not want a comfortable bolt hole to stay in at your favourite fishing spot? To come and go as you please, without having to set up camp every time. Somewhere where you can fish all day and come back to air-conditioned comfort, a proper bed and great facilities, with a pub just across the road. Sounds like heaven to me.

Lucinda is an ideal jumping off point for exploring (and fishing) the Hinchinbrook Channel, the Great Barrier Reef and the islands in between. Not to mention great fishing around the sugar jetty (which is the longest jetty in the Southern Hemisphere at 5.76 km’s).

Hinchinbrook Channel

Hinchinbrook Channel

A few years ago, Mike (my long-suffering husband) and I found ourselves heading up to Lucinda on a regular basis to fish. I mean who wouldn’t? Only an hour forty drive from home, great scenery and a fantastic options on where to go if the weather is not too great. So the problem? Well we either stayed in the apartments and villas at the boat ramp (expensive option) or camped out with our boat, tent and all related paraphernalia in the local caravan park (cheaper option).

Whilst we love camping, the time it took to set up camp and the weather in North Queensland (humid nights, hot days and the odd cyclone) was not conducive to a quick and comfortable fishing getaway. We would leave after work on a Friday, meaning nine times out of ten we would be setting up camp in the dark (which has the potential to be divorce material). We would then fish Saturday and come back to our camp hot, sweaty and sometimes a bit smelly (also potentially divorce material!). We would also have to pack down Sunday morning (check out time at the caravan park), so no fishing, as our tent and everything was transported in the boat. So this was inconvenient, it ate into our time out on the water and seriously interfered with my chances of getting as many hours fishing in as possible.

Over the years we realised that occasionally some of the spots had caravans on all year round. After a bit of investigation it turned out that the park owners had one for sale. So after much discussion with the husband (about 5 minutes worth) we made them an offer and signed ourselves up for a lease agreement and the caravan! Our own little Holmes away from Home! (Just for those that do not get it our surname is Holmes, play on words people).

So now we had a caravan (in sore need of some attention), but it did have air-conditioning and the park had all the facilities you could ever want (beautiful shower blocks, swimming pool, bbq’s and friendly staff). Time for Reno’s.

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That is where the fun began. I go to Lucinda to fish not to spend time renovating a caravan! My husband, being a very thorough chap likes to get things done in quick time, he cannot bear dragging out jobs. I on the other hand would spend my life (24/7) fishing. Hmmm a potential divorce making situation?

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Before Reno’s

So I sacrificed a couple of weekends fishing to assist in the renovations. I know he is such a lucky husband having a wife willing to take one for the team!

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During Reno’s

Let’s not mention the fact that buying the caravan was so I could go fishing more often and come back to comfort and luxury! And because you never let the truth get in the way of a good story I will not tell you about the two weekends of hard work he put in to finish the reno’s whilst I was swanning off in Italy with Miss Progress International Australia!

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Finished

If you want to take advantage of the great fishing in the Hinchinbrook area, stay at the Wanderers Holiday Village, great place to stop and unwind.

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Visit http://www.wanderers-lucinda.com.au/